Books tagged with 'Philosophy'
Thumbnail
  • Indigo.ca icon
  • Anna's Archive icon
  • LibGen icon
  • Goodreads icon
  • Github icon

This is the book on Daoism that Ursula K. Le Guin recommends in her rendition of the Tao Te Ching for anyone who reads the Tao Te Ching and wants to learn more about Daoism.

I’m about a 1/3 of my way through the text. The first Appendix got a good chuckle out of me. The text is pretty much exactly what you might expect and with Ursula K. Le Guin’s seal of approval, I’m expecting the rest of it to be just as good.

Thumbnail
⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐
  • Indigo.ca icon
  • Anna's Archive icon
  • LibGen icon
  • Goodreads icon
  • Github icon

A cat goes on a journey of self-discovery, teaching and being taught the philosophy of Zen Buddhism.

The art is great, the text is well written. It’s a philosophical picture book for all ages. What’s not to like?

Thumbnail
⭐▫️▫️▫️▫️
  • Indigo.ca icon
  • Anna's Archive icon
  • LibGen icon
  • Goodreads icon
  • Github icon

Not my cup of tea. Philosophy should be understandable, this text is incomprehensible.

Maybe if was downing absinthe with Sartre and his crew back in the forties when this was written, I would “get” it. As-is though, this is pretty hard to get through.

Thumbnail
⭐▫️▫️▫️▫️
  • Indigo.ca icon
  • Anna's Archive icon
  • LibGen icon
  • Goodreads icon
  • Github icon

I’m deathly allergic to cats (especially unneutered cats) so despite liking them in theory, I can’t spend much time with them.

I’m not allergic to philosophy though. This book talks about cats, talks about philosophy and uses the promise of cats to ease you into thinking about philosophy.

At least, that’s what I think it’s trying to do?

Thumbnail
⭐⭐⭐⭐▫️
  • Indigo.ca icon
  • Anna's Archive icon
  • LibGen icon
  • Goodreads icon
  • Github icon

A short semi-biographical discussion and guide on meditation.

TBH I sped through this, I need to read it again.

I remember it having some pretty funny moment where the author puts Jesus on blast.

Thumbnail
⭐⭐⭐⭐▫️
  • Indigo.ca icon
  • Anna's Archive icon
  • LibGen icon
  • Goodreads icon
  • Github icon

I much preferred Gia-Fu Feng and Jane English’s translation of the Tao Te Ching. I’m not an ancient Chinese scholar so I can’t speak to how faithful this translation is compared to the original manuscript.

But I can say that the poetry doesn’t flow well and some translation choices left me scratching my head — wondering if Thomas Cleary understands how the English language works.

Thumbnail
⭐⭐▫️▫️▫️
  • Indigo.ca icon
  • Anna's Archive icon
  • LibGen icon
  • Goodreads icon
  • Github icon

Games are a unique art form. They do not just tell stories, nor are they simply conceptual art. They are the art form that works in the medium of agency. C. Thi Nguyen’s Games: Agency as Art dives deep into these ideas and expands on them.

Thumbnail
⭐⭐⭐⭐▫️
  • Indigo.ca icon
  • Anna's Archive icon
  • LibGen icon
  • Goodreads icon
  • Github icon

Think is a book about the big questions in life: knowledge, consciousness, fate, God, truth, goodness, justice. It is for anyone who believes there are big questions out there, but does not know how to approach them. Think sets out to explain what they are and why they are important. If you’re like me, and you knew barely anything about philosophy before reading this, you’re in for a wild ride.

Thumbnail
⭐▫️▫️▫️▫️
  • Indigo.ca icon
  • Anna's Archive icon
  • LibGen icon
  • Goodreads icon
  • Github icon

The Pig That Wants to Be Eaten offers one hundred philosophical thought-experiments. To get the most out of it, you might want to pull it out and discuss a thought-experiment with some friends because the book doesn’t do much more than present the thought-experiments one after the other.

Thumbnail
⭐⭐⭐▫️▫️
  • Indigo.ca icon
  • Anna's Archive icon
  • LibGen icon
  • Goodreads icon
  • Github icon

Marcus Aurelius Antoninus (a.d. 121–180) succeeded his adoptive father as emperor of Rome in a.d. 161—and in his Meditations he provides insights, wisdom, and practical guidance on everything from living in the world to coping with adversity to interacting with others. It’s surprising how much of his advice has aged well but given his position of supreme power and the changing times (eg. slavery is bad), some of his meditations have not aged so well.